Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
Book TV 22
Journal 10
( more )
STATION
CNNW 73
CSPAN2 49
KQED (PBS) 39
MSNBCW 36
LINKTV 28
CSPAN 22
KGO (ABC) 18
KRCB (PBS) 18
FBC 17
FOXNEWS 13
KCSMMHZ 13
CURRENT 10
KCSM (PBS) 10
KPIX (CBS) 10
KQEH (PBS) 9
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 514
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 524 (some duplicates have been removed)
. pakistan is one of three countries in the world where polio is still endemic. it is considered the key battleground in the global fight against the disease, which attacks the nervous system and could cause permanent paralysis within hours of infection. polio paralyzed almost 200 children here in 2011, the worst figures in 15 years. health experts not only fear more violence against the workers but also a sharp increase in the number of young people who contract a preventable disease. al jazeera, islam about. >> pakistan is one of three countries were poked -- polio is still widespread, along with afghanistan and nigeria. who launched its anti plebeian drive and pakistan in -- by 2005, only 28 cases were recorded across the country. after that year, a concerted campaign by extremist groups led to a decrease in the number of polio vaccinations. there were 190 polio cases in 2011, most of them in the country piece in northwest. healthpeak to the world organization piece a director for the eastern mediterranean joining us now on the telephone from cairo. the deaths of nine health workers i
. benazir bhutto was sworn in as prime minister of pakistan on december 2nd come in 1888. this is about an hour 15. >> back at home this evening. in the kitchen cooking at winning to my parents bedroom and sat as they watch television on the bed. he was a little child then in this so easy to take care of. we were lazily watching boston's ace, a show made in the 19th 60s about the same astronauts. there's nothing else on. sophie was laying on his stomach, hat in hand sand and i sat on side of the bed repining mse may hide against the head word. it was close to 8:00 when the phone rang. is to grow from ninth-grade class at the american school. she was going to arrange for us to meet over the weekend to discuss a history project. i slumped down leaning against the bad cover sitting on the fly with remy spent talking on the phone. we were speaking when i first heard the gunfire. it was a single shot and kind of eerie close. and that the phone from my ear and waited to see if he had heard it. the sound was still ringing in the ears of several seconds later the echoes of kershaw was interrupt
with matthieu aikins who is just returned from two months in pakistan, examining what led to the capture and killing of osama bin laden. his piece is called, "the doctor, the cia, and the blood of bin laden." that is the african national congress in south africa votes to support a boycott divestment and sanctions, we look at a new film "road map to apartheid." >> i have been able to visit israel and palestine on more than two occasions. and what i experienced there was such a cruel reminder of a at a painful to protest south africa. we were largely controlled in the same way. >> we will speak with the israeli and south african born co-director of the film, then reverend billy on the end of the world. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. people across the united states are expected to join a moment of silence at 9:30 this morning to mark one week since the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. last friday morning, adam lanza opened fire at the school, killing 20 children and six a
. the tribal policemen in pakistan and fights for his life after 21 of his colleagues are adapted and killed by the telegram -- taliban. the sectarian and divide. there continue to protest against the shia-led government. but the armored is of the moment there russian airliner crash lands on a road near a moscow airport. the turkish prime minister says the current glut in syria could be coming to an end very soon. -- says the conflict in syria to be coming to an end. these pictures appear to show fighters in an eastern damascus suburb. hashim, the turkish prime minister says the bloody conflict soon be over. why is he saying that? >> they have been saying about for the last few months. he said a dictator cannot stay in power by killing his own people. the news behind his statement is that there is a new syrian administration coming in very soon. maybe he is referring to the plans to establish an interim government when the conditions on the ground are there. they have a major concern. they say there is a group of deputies that we stream in if the crisis moves are. this is why they have asked
. it is these people who will pay the price. >> the son of pakistan's former prime minister bhutto has made its debut. he addressed the crowd of thousands marking five years since his mother's death. benazir bhutto was killed after an election rally. >> more than 200,000 turned out looking to the past, present and future. three generations of pakistan's political dynasty. >> they remembered former president bhutto gunned down five years ago on thursday. her life mirrored her father's father's, dying a violent death. the crowd heard from her husband, pakistan's current president. and they were introduced to the next generation her 24-year-old son who becomes the chairman of the pakistan people's party. [speaking foreign language] >> today, it is sad and a delightful day for me. i feel proud as the son of benazir bhutto's son, i want to tell you by the grace of god he has completed his studies but now this is his training time. >> this was his first major political speech. he memorized it because having memorized in dubai he's not fluent. >> my honorable mother was killed publically. thousands of worke
children and five women are shot dead in pakistan simply for distributing polio vaccines. jansing into the future decades ne o one electronic superhighway long before many even knew he was being built. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. four days after the mass shootings in newtown, conn., the funerals continue for the 22 becomes lost their lives. and while the town mourns, the white house issued its strongest indication yet it will be pushing for tighter gun controls, including reinstating the assault weapons ban. from newtown, we begin our coverage. >> she loved or go wales and horses. a beautiful girl, her parents said. 6-year-old jessica was buried. another victim in america. that terrible friday as parents waited to hear what happened in the school, their pastor was with them. >> one parent, one mother in desperation cried out "are there any survivors?" there was violence. there were officials looking at one another and then they said, no, there are no survivors. i do not know that i will ever forget the noise as people wept
last month. investigating a number of cases. >>> afghanistan and pakistan have agreed to jointly investigate last week's assassination attempt on an afghan spy chief. tension between the two neighbors has risen amid accusations the raid was planned over the border inside pakistan. the chief of afghanistan's national directorate of security was wounded. he was a target of a suicide bomber posing as aaliban peace envoy. rzai indirectly said the assassination plot was drawn up inside pakistan and the attack came from that country. karzai met his pakistani counterpart in the turkish capital on wednesday. they aagrgreed to establish a jt working group to investigate the incident. >> we should be taking practical steps in bringing more confidence and trust with the reserves to the countri on of afghanistan and pakistan. >> i consider all incidents which are meaningful and put them in the fact that we are hurting them. therefore, they're striking us hard back. >> military groups based in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas frequently cross into afghanistan to carry out attacks. the afg
than just a meaningful conversation. >> pala items they're remembering newtown. now to pakistan where five female health workers there to help with the country's anti- polio drive have been shot. their deaths come just one day after another polio program worker was also killed. the taliban has said the vaccination drive is part of a western plot. >> it is hard to explain why women would be shot dead for providing children care. that is what has happened in pakistan. four female health workers killed in different parts of karachi, another in a different city as they tried to vaccinate against polio. police say the -- it is clear these were coordinated attacks. the taliban are in charge of this area, says the mother of one of the victims. they say this polio-polio program was planned by america to finish off our nation. they shot my daughter in the head. in the 1990's, about 20,000 people and here in pakistan were affected by polio. that came down to just 28 in 2005. but the numbers have risen since then and there is a risk they could rise further. what changed was propaganda from the p
has the story. >> reporter: afghanistan and pakistan agreed to investigate last week's attempted assassinati assassination. tensions have risen since they said the assassination was planned on the other side of the border. the chief of afghanistan's national director of security was seriously wounded. a close aide to president hamid karzai, he was the target of a suicide bomber posing as a taliban peace envoy. karzai indirectly said the assassination plot was drawn up inside pakistan and the attack came from that country. karzai met his pakistani counterpart in the turkish capital on wednesday. they agreed to establish a joint working group to investigate the incident. >> we should be taking practical steps in bringing more confidence and trust with reserves to the countries of afghanistan and pakistan. >> i consider all incidents which are meaningful and the fact that we are hurting them. therefore, they're striking us hard back. >> reporter: militant groups based in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas frequently cross into afghanistan to carry out attacks. the afghan governmen
are dispatched to the battlefield. they know if they win, they will inherit their country. >> pakistan is marking the to anniversary of the death of former prime minister benazir bhutto. she was killed in a suicide attack at an election rally. no one has ever been convicted of her killing. thousands of people are gathering at the family mausoleum for a commemoration. thursday's events are expected to launch the political career of her son. elections are expected in the next. few next he is the co-chairman of the pakistan people's party along with his father. he is still too young at 24 to stand as the age limit is 25. he's expected to head up a reelection campaign for the ppp. of joining me is our correspondent who's been following events in islamabad. much depends on what is said today and how the public response to him as to whether he will be a hit or miss. >> indeed. it should also not be forgotten that the performance of the pakistan people's party has not convinced the people across the country that the country is going towards financial bankruptcy and the fact that the ppp has already lost
be there should be a timeline when does end? when did do we stop and leave in haiti or pakistan anywhere else in the world. time line to zero. vitally important. she said that. the second thing getting back to the question, had to do with corruption. she talked about corruption as an obstacle to development. tied a line directly between corruption in poor countries and corruption in the united states inside the contracts that are fedback. she talked about development. we can talk about a lot other systems and tieing that line that we are also part of the world subject is the same kind of forces of incumbent economic interest capturing the political process, getting government contracts, and effecting outcomes. we are also subject to that. to see somebody like that saying that. it's true and deeply important. philip auerswald. you whereabout the current telecommunications revolution that we're all living. >> trying to understand and manage. >> right. >> help us. >> well, okay. first of all, we have to understand the difference between a mobile phone and a rich country. and a mobile phone -- so
on health workers in pakistan this week. the violence put a halt to vaccine work in the country. our reporter in bangkok has more. >>> gunmen shot and killed 12 members of polio vaccination teams in separate incidents around pakistan this week. the united nations is protecting staff members in the country by taking them off duty. the u.n. has responded to the attacks. >> the killing of health workers in pakistan were cruel, senseless and inexcusable acts that i condemn in the strongest of terms. those killed were among thousands across pakistan, especially women who are working selflessly. >> the world health organization is also speaking out against the violence, saying it is depriving the population of potentially life-saving health care. >> irrespective of the circumstances of the situation, attacks on health workers, health facilities or health services are completely unacceptable. >> women health workers held protests in the southern city of karachi and in the capital islamabad. they are demanding that authorities provide them with protection to accomplish their goal of ending p
in pakistan earlier this month that pitted some of japan's strongest men against each other. professional wrestling used to be popular in pakistan and thousands showed up for the exhibition matches. behind the scenes is a long history between a japanese wrestling giant and a legendary local family. our reporter has the story. >> reporter: more than 20,000 people showed turned up to see this pro wrestling event. several japanese wrestlers took to the ring but the real star of the show was none other than retired strong man inoki. he may be 69 years old now but he remains popular around the world and his enormous popularity in pakistan hasn't wayned. >> translator: i saw his match in pakistan in 1976. we respect him because he's a great wrestler. >> reporter: inoki visited pakistan twice in the 1970s to take on local wrestlers. the first bout in 1976 pitted him against juan, a national hero who has been known as the world's strongest man. he came from a family of wrestlers who were widely popular among pakistanis. the family was given the title which means wrestler as a sign of respect. but
in the event of an accident. >>> wrestling fans turned out for events in pakistan earlier this month that pitted some of japan's strongest men against each other. professional wrestling used to be popular in pakistan and thousands showed up for the exhibition matches. behind the scenes is a long history between a japanese wrestling giant and a legendary local family. verk has the story. >> reporter: more than 20,000 people turned up to see this pro wrestling event. several wrestlers took to the ring. but there was no one better than strong man antonio noki. he may be 69 years old now, but he remains popular around the world, and his enormous presence in pakistan is a win. >> translator: i saw anoki's match in pakistan in 1976. we respect him because he's a great wrestler. >> reporter: anoki visited pakistan twice in the 1970s to take on local wrestlers. the first bout in 1976 pitted him against a national hero who was billed as the world's strongest man. he came from a family of wrestlers who were widely popular among pakistanis. the family was given the title elvan, which means wres
on the matter. >>> wrestling fans turned out for events in pakistan earlier this month that pitted some of japan's strongest men against each other. professional wrestling used to be popular in pakistan and thousands showed up for the exhibition matches. behind the scenes is a long history between a japanese wrestling giant and a legendary local family. our reporter has the story. r more than 20,000 people showed up for this event. he may be 69 years old now but he is as popular around the world and his enormous popularity in pakistan hasn't wand. >> translator: i saw his match in pakistan in 1976. we respect him because he's a gret wr great wrestler. rpt he visited pakistan twit in the 1970s it take on local wrestlers. the first bout in 1976 pitted him against juan, a national hero who has been known as the world's strongest man. he came from a family of wrestlers who were widely popular among pakistanis. the family was given the title which means wrestler as a sign of respect. but in the 1976 match against inoki, his shoulder was dislocated and he lost the match. the whole country was stunned
in singapore and is said to be fighting for her life in pakistan, the latest member of the troubled bhutto dynasty has pledged to continue the fight against income is in. bilawal bhutto zardari was speaking in the ancestral hometown. >> a huge crowd filled with the name, amid tight security. some 200,000 people gathered to witness what is perhaps the newest chapter of the political dynasty. the third generation seemed acutely aware of the world that could be played for the future. >> my hon. mother was killed publicly. thousands of workers have been murdered but we did not abandoned pakistan and would not abandon pakistan. pakistan in the hands of tyrants. this is our pakistan. >> the family has been at the center of politics in pakistan. his mother was prime minister. since 2008, her husband has been president. he was by his son's side for this speech in which he continued -- in which bilawal bhutto zardari pledged to continue the fight. there was also a discussion about the violence plaguing the country. this is something he knows all too much about. he was just 19 of his mother was kill
by her father and taken to pakistan three years ago is now heading back to britain. also, the era of the third age on the silver screen. >> hello, thanks for being with us. russian president putin has signed a bill which bans americans from adopting russian children. the controversial move is said to be part of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own go
in pakistan. we explore what of the country's more unusual exports. other stories you have been looking at online, at our review of some of the biggest mobile moments of the past 12 months. a year which saw youtube video break the 1 billion mark for the first time. social media continues to capture the attention of millions as must watch videos. also, many of you have been finding out whether belgium can claim to be the world's tartlet capital after inventing prailine in 1912, became known for making the best chocolate in the world. one of the local chocolatiers is under threat, especially by austria. from paraguay, and orchestra of young musicians from islam have been touring south america using instruments constructed entirely from recycled materials. they pulled them from the rubbish dumps around their homes. you can get more on our web sites bbc.com on those stories and many more. the spanish tenor coming go has performed in front of 20,000 people to raise money and awareness for youth orchestra in the violence-plagued city of acapulco. ♪ he was joined by 320 young performers were
. thank you, ed. pakistan is a walking disaster. militants there have a new target: humanitarian workers who are just trying to save children's lives with a complete report on the taliban leaders accusing the aid workers of trying to sterilize muslims. rebels in syria have the leader in a corner this afternoon. they say they are very afraid the president's next move could be catastrophic. hey, it's me, progressive insurance. you know, from our 4,000 television commercials. yep, there i am with flo. hoo-hoo! watch it! [chuckles] anyhoo, 3 million people switched to me last year, saving an average of $475. [sigh] it feels good to help people save... with great discounts like safe driver, multicar, and multipolicy. so call me today. you'll be glad you did. cannonbox! [splash!] >>shepard: a syrian rebel commander fears the president there, bashar al-assad, will unleash chemical weapons on his people. the rebel general who defected from the syrian army is telling the associateed press his regime can and will use chemical weapons unless the international community helps the rebels take him out
collapse, which can lead to more we cement and a revolt. >> pakistan's interior minister is in india holding talks with officials there. the two countries are trying to take steps to these visa restrictions for travelers. >> interaction between state to state must come down. the visa policy reflects how seriously both governments feel about this policy, which is going to be beneficial to the people of india and pakistan. but this new agreement will allow more freedom and movement between the two -- this new agreement will allow more freedom and movement between the two countries. >> if we get ourselves killed from terrorist, we will into nowhere. we want to fight terrorism and extremism and all of the groups goal commonly together. the way we are moving forward, like sharing information that the intelligence level -- now they will be seeing the investigative work at the fia level. they will connect at every level. >> police in pakistan say 5 taliban members have been killed. police have been searching for the group who they say drove a vehicle packed with explosives onto an airfield.
into recession. you're watching al-jazeera live from london. also coming up, 21 policemen are buried in pakistan after being kidnap and shot by the taliban. anger and grief in india. candlelit vigils continue as the 22-year-old gang rape victim is cremated. plus moments of impact -- amateur video captures a russian plane after it overshoots a runway and crashes into a motorway. hello, president obama has made another appeal to the u.s. congress to reach an agreement in the next 48 hours to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. it's a term used to describe the expiry of tax cuts dating back to 2001. if there is no deal, 88% of americans will end up paying $400 billion more in 2014. that will be coupled with more than a trillion dollars in automatic government spending cuts. according to the congressional budget office it will start with $200 billion in military and social welfare cuts next year. the big concern over falling off the fiscal cliff is it will send the u.s. back into a recession with, of course, global repercussions. it could be weeks before anyone feels the effects. and analysts say even
, welcome to "gmt." a violent setback of the rise against polio in pakistan. five health workers were killed following criticism of the vaccination program. seen but not heard, the queen sits in on a cabinet meeting at downing street, the first floor and i and 200 years to do so. it is midday in london, 7:00 in the morning in connecticut, 2:00 in the afternoon in south africa, where the president has survived a challenge from within the ruling african congress. he was reelected at a park -- at a party conference, making him the overwhelming favorite to win the nationwide general election next year. home and dry, plenty of people think that the allegations of mismanagement that followed him make him and unsuitable man to be presiding over the party that nelson mandela once led. our bluebird -- our editor, john simpson. >> the first world. clean, tidy, prosperous. even the bicycles are the top of the range. the black middle class in south africa is now 3 million strong. this place is where the amc was founded centuries ago. today the leaders enjoy the trappings of power. they remain remarkably
influence on pakistan. which to me is the most dangerous place in the world. and i don't think that trying to stabilize the afghan situation by building up troop levels there that can make it a really stable country is going to work. >> so what's a right approach then to make sure that pakistan doesn't become -- >> well, that's -- that's a very difficult problem. because the pakistanis don't trust us. and yet, we depend upon the pakistani government to keep control of its nuclear weapons. the right combination of satisfying pakistan and pushing pakistan to -- not to become a radical islamic state is going to be difficult. but i think that keeping afghanistan from destabilizing pakistan is a very important thing. >> you talked about a nuclear arms state. iran, the united states, and the world community has been pressuring iran to not go nuclear or not develop nuclear weapons. it appears that despite sanctions, there is an enormous popular sentiment in iran to continue developing nuclear capabilities. and there are those who say that an attack on iran is an inevitably and is going tubenose a
value person of interest at abad -- abbottabad, facemask stan. -- pakistan. >> when did it become clear that it was osama bin laden? >> even at that point it was a wholly circumstantial case. there was not direct evidence you could present to the president at that point saying we guarantee you, we have direct evidence that osama bin laden is at this compound. >> you excluded the secretary of state, the secondary of defense. tell us about that. >> to have in the first instance the analytical people, really the seoul team working on this. >> the cia. >> then it moved when we made decisions about going operational, that is the fed to bring in the special forces that expanded a bit that the president was insistent that it obviously be very closely held, that we have the people involved in every stage that were necessary to be involved. why was that? security was incredibly important. and i think it was a testament frankly to the seriousness of purpose and frankly to the character of the individuals s involved in this that not a thing linked from august 2010 until may 2011. >> that's an ext
at abbottabad, pakistan, in a compound there. >> at what point did it become clear there was a high likelihood the person was osama bin laden? >> you say "high likelihood" and this is why it was a tough decision. even at the last principals meeting on april 28, 2011, where the principals sat with the president and gave him their view whether to go or not, even at that point it was a circumstantial case. there was no direct evidence saying we warrantee you, we have direct evidence that osama bin laden is at this compound. >> one of the things you decided to do -- and it must have been the president and you and a small number of people. to limit access to this information and decision-making to a very tight circle. >> yes. >> that excluded the secretary of state, the secretary of defense. take us through that decision-making. >> there was a decision made because of the extreme sensitivity about this, to have in the first instance the analytical people, really the solo team working on this. >> at the cia. >> and we made decisions about going operational. bringing in the special forces, expand it.
to the pakistani relationship. we were undertaking a unilateral action inside pakistan to go after osama bin laden. so all those risks were on the table and had to be considered by the president and the principals who made their recommendation. i will tell you this in connection to your question, there was a lot of history present in the room, secretary gates. there was a national security aide during desert one. i was a young aid to president carter. vice president biden was in the senate. it was clearly on people's minds. also what was in the room, it's interesting, was one of the aspects that came out of desert one and that was the formation of a unified special operation forces command, the very troops, the forces here that would carry out this operation that had become such a unique asset of the united states. >> the president made one decision informed it seems to me like that history, which is he asked for two backup helicopters. >> the president asked for enough assets to ensure that the united states on its own could get in and could get out of the abbottabad compound. >> so now take us t
person of interest at abad bad pakistan at a compound there. >> at what point did it become tler there was a high likelihood that was osama bin laden? >> you say high likelihood. even at the last principals meeting on april 28th, 2011, where the principals sat with the president and gave them their view, even at that point it was a wholly circumstantial case. there was not direct evidence you could present to the president at that point saying we guarantee you we have direct evidence that osama bin laden is at this compound. >> one of the things you decided to do and it must have been the president and you or very small number of people, to limit access to this information and decision making to a very tight circle. >> yes. >> that excluded the secretary of state, the secretary of defense. take us through that decision making. >> there was a decision made because of the extreme sensitivity about this to have at the first -- in the first instance have the analytical people be really the sole team working on this. >> at the cia. >> at the cia. and then it moved and we made decision
into a bus in pakistan on sunday. police suspect it was an act of sec say sectarian violence. the bus burst into flames, killing at least 19 people. 25 people were hurt and are being treated in the hospital. police say the truck was loaded with explosives. witnesses say its driver appeared to have targeted the bus. shiite muslims were headed to a pilgrimage. new york human base watch says attacks on minority shias are on the rise in pakistan. more than 300 shias have been killed in 2012. >>> venezuelan president chavez has suffered more complications from cancer surgery. the country's vice president suggested the situation does not allow for optimism. the announcement came ahead of a presidential inauguration ceremony for chavez's fourth term on january 10th. the vice president said the new complications follow a respiratory infection that surfaced after the surgery he had in december in cuba. mudora appeared on state-run tv with chavez's daughter and says his health continues to be delicate. there's increasing speculation that the inauguration ceremony in january may have to be postponed.
to pakistan is reunited with her mother in the u.k. welcome to "bbc world news." also to come, no where to pray for moslems in athens. and a quite at hollywood that revolution, making big returns to the silver screen. >>> breaking news coming to us from singapore. in the past few minutes, it was just announced that the indian woman who was gang raped in delhi earlier this month that has caused national average has died. she was being treated at a hospital in singapore where she was on life-support. in india, her brutal attack triggered nationwide protests. the authorities struggling to contain the growing anger. we have received a statement from a doctor, the chief executive of the hospital where she was being looked after. "we are very sad to report the patient passed away peacefully at 4: 40 5:00 a.m. today singapore time. her family and officials from the high commission of india were at her side. we join her family in mourning her loss. the patient had remained in extremely critical condition since admission to hospital from the morning of december 27. despite all efforts by a team
pakistan. in comparison to the last 15 years, how much the relationship between the pakistani-based military organization, especially those in power, they are in bed with al qaeda or others? one of the pakistani federal ministers said the islamic -- they have relations with the extremist organization there. he has provided whatever evidence he has. there was also talk from the pakistani officials [inaudible] in your comparison, do you see the relationship being broken? >> that is a big question. i will try to be very brief. the connections between various to extremist groups in pakistan and al qaeda remained deep. as i suggested, i think mumbai plot, if carefully studied, underscores those connections. i think we have seen it in other instances. people tend to give away their real feelings in moments of grief. for the jihad to groups in pakistan, the death of been great.xpressed his it is hard to say they don't have a connection in moments of the eulogy when they are terribly sorry to see him go. sct has led the effort, as i understand it, in this government to try to broaden
.s. relations with pakistan and status of al qaeda. from the brookings constitution. it's a little less than an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] good morning, thank you for your patience. my name is daniel -- i'm the research -- [inaudible] at the center here at brookings. i think the issue of terrorism has been on the agenda in various forms in the united states easily since 9/11, but of course, for people like our -- speakers today. [inaudible] at the end of the first term of the obama administration, it seemed like an appropriate point to look at the track record and ahead at the challenges remaining. i'm delighting we have two speakers who can do that extremely well for us today. our first speaker in the main speaker today is ambassador -- [inaudible] is the coordinates for counterterrorism at the state department. he's held number reduce government positions, i'm also quite pleased to say for several years was a senior fellow here at the brookings institution. he is also the author of two noted books, [inaudible] and the next attack. and i would say to the loss of the public,
and our genes. plus, an exit interview with the u.s. envoy to afghanistan and pakistan. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: as judy just mentioned, the u.s. ambassador to the u.n.-- susan rice-- withdrew her name from consideration for the office of secretary of state today. president obama released a statement saying he'd accepted her decision, but regretted the unfair and misleading attacks on her in recent weeks. rice has come under criticism from congressional republicans for not immediately calling the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya a terrorist action. in her letter, rice wrote, "the position of secretary of state should never be politicized. i'm saddened that we have reached this point." in u.s. economic news, the number of americans filing new claims for jobless benefits fell sharply last week to its second- lowest level this year. and retail sales rebounded in november, rising 0.3% but that seemingly good news did little to help stocks on wall street today. the dow jones industrial average lost almost 75 points to
at in point, that led them to believe there was a high-value person of interest at jalalabad, pakistan. >> at what point did it become clear that it was osama bin laden? >> you say likelihood, this is why that was a tough decision. even at the point it was a wholly circle case. there was not direct evidence you could present to the president at that point saying we guarantee you, we have direct evidence that osama bin laden is at this compound. >> one of the things you decided to do, and it must have been the president and you were, a very small number of people, to limit access to this information, and decision-making, to a very tight circuit that excluded the secretary of state, the secretary of defense. take us through that decision-making. >> there was a decision made because of the extreme sensitivity about this to have, at the first, in the first instance, have the analytical people. really, the sole team working on this. >> the cia? >> at the cia. >> then it moved when we made decisions about going operational. that is, the need to bring in the special forces that expanded it a
.n.'s polio eradication campaign in pakistan, after the killings of nine aid workers. >> suarez: from capitol hill, kwame holman reports on two congressional hearings today where state department officials accepted blame in failing to protect the u.s. diplomatic mission in libya. >> we have to do better. we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. we owe it to the security professionals who acted with such extraordinary heroism that awful night to try to protect them, and we owe it to thousands of our colleagues serving america with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> br
. a neighboring nation of pakistan, we assumed in announcing the troops urge strategy, i say we, i'm saying the u.s. government, that the pakistan to crack down on the sanctuaries. they never did. the taliban are still -- humongous amount of freedom of movement in neighboring pakistan. we assumed that the afghan military would stand up and really take charge of security. as we've seen from news reports seemingly everyday, afghan soldiers are now focused on shooting american troops in many cases as opposed to defending their country. and so we have just had a pretty horrible turn of events. as security improved in some areas? yes. i want to be clear on that. when we send our men and women in uniform to places they will do good things, and security has gotten better and pockets of southern afghanistan, but will those gains be sustained? will the afghans be able to take the baton from our troops as they come home? those surge forces have come home this summer, additional troops that will likely come home next year and a year after, will the afghan to do what's necessary to make the blood and treasur
's agency unicef and the well had organization have -- who have suspended polio vaccinations in pakistan. >> nine people have been killed since the start of a polio revocation campaign that began on monday. pakistan is one of just three countries in the world still struggling to eliminate the disease. the taliban has stopped vaccination teams from entering some parts of the country and spread rumors that the teams are a cover-up for spy campaigns in a plot to sterilize muslims. >> german business confidence has risen again for the second month in a row. although europe's biggest economy is experiencing a slowdown, this fresh optimism for the six months ahead. >> the closely watched fio -- ifo index climbed by one point this month. only wholesalers and retailers are not sharing the positive outlook. the index takes the pulse of 7000 companies across germany. for more now, we had to the franc fort -- frankfurt stock exchange. positive news on the german economy. has that brought some cheer on the floor there? >> this is indeed a very nice christmas present and a strong signal that the germ
nations has suspended its immunization program in pakistan after a spate of attacks. gunmen have killed 10 workers in the past few days. >> more attacks against health workers in pakistan. this time, gunmen shot and killed the polio vaccination supervisor and her driver in the northwest of the country. nearby, a student volunteer died from wounds she sustained in an earlier gun attack. that brings wednesday's death toll to 3. >> we remain committed to the decision of the government. they make the decision, not us. it will make the decision when the campaign starts, when the drive continues, but my understanding is that all the partners spearheading this is the government, it is committed to finishing the job. >> a day earlier, five female health workers were shot dead in karachi, while another female worker was killed in an attack elsewhere. their deaths followed the killing of a doctor monday. investigators said the attacks were well coordinated. no group has claimed responsibility, but in recent months, the pakistani taliban has issued threats against vaccination programs, particularly t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 524 (some duplicates have been removed)